What is IVF-ICSI? Why does it improve Success Rates?2019-10-08T07:16:14+00:00
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In Vitro Fertilization with Intracytoplasmic sperm injection ICSI

The Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection is a technique that we perform in many In Vitro Fertilization treatments. We inseminate an egg through the microinjection of a sperm. Only one sperm per egg is needed.

The steps before and after insemination are the same as in a classic in vitro fertilization. The egg is fertilized, becomes a pre-embryo and is transferred to the uterus to continue its development.

How did it come into existence?

The ICSI emerged in 1992 to treat cases of male sterility such as oligozoospermia (low concentration of sperm), astenozoospermia (low motility) or teratozoospermia (few sperm with suitable morphology), among others. It was a breakthrough in the treatment of male sterility and has given many men the opportunity to be parents who, otherwise, would not have seen their dream of paternity fulfilled.

Phases

Step 1

Ovarian stimulation icon

Ovarian control and stimulation

We administer hormones every day for 10-12 days in order to stimulate the ovaries and obtain the eggs. We control the hormonal levels and the development of the follicles (egg container sacs) in the ovaries. When the number and size of the follicles is suitable, we determine the day of extraction.

Step 2

Egg extraction icon

Extraction of the eggs and in vitro fertilization

We extract the eggs using deep sedation by means of the puncture and aspiration of the follicles. The eggs are kept in culture for a few hours and, in the meantime, we prepare the sperm in order to isolate the motile sperm. We prepare the eggs, and with the intracytoplasmic injection, we insert a spermatozoon into each one.

Step 3

Transfer

The day after the extraction and fertilization of the eggs, we know how many of them have been fertilized. Between two and six days, the fertilized eggs become pre-embryos, ready to be transferred to the uterus. On the day of the transfer, we select the pre-embryos that have the best development characteristics. According to the law, up to 3 pre-embryos can be transferred, but usually it is just 1 or 2. Pre-embryos are placed in a thin catheter and inserted into the uterus. No anaesthesia is needed in the transfer.

Step 4

Freezing icon

Cryopreservation

We freeze the pre-embryos that have not been transferred with liquid nitrogen, which is known as vitrification. We identify them and store them in the embryo bank. These pre-embryos can be used in later cycles if a pregnancy is not achieved on the first attempt or, if it is achieved, for a second baby. The treatment to prepare the uterus for a transfer of frozen embryos is simpler, since it is not necessary to stimulate or extract the eggs.

Step 1

Ovarian stimulation icon

Ovarian control and stimulation

We administer hormones every day for 10-12 days in order to stimulate the ovaries and obtain the eggs. We control the hormonal levels and the development of the follicles (egg container sacs) in the ovaries. When the number and size of the follicles is suitable, we determine the day of extraction.

Step 2

Egg extraction icon

Extraction of the eggs and in vitro fertilization

We extract the eggs using deep sedation by means of the puncture and aspiration of the follicles. The eggs are kept in culture for a few hours and, in the meantime, we prepare the sperm in order to isolate the motile sperm. We prepare the eggs, and with the intracytoplasmic injection, we insert a spermatozoon into each one.

Step 3

Transfer

The day after the extraction and fertilization of the eggs, we know how many of them have been fertilized. Between two and six days, the fertilized eggs become pre-embryos, ready to be transferred to the uterus. On the day of the transfer, we select the pre-embryos that have the best development characteristics. According to the law, up to 3 pre-embryos can be transferred, but usually it is just 1 or 2. Pre-embryos are placed in a thin catheter and inserted into the uterus. No anaesthesia is needed in the transfer.

Step 4

Freezing icon

Cryopreservation

We freeze the pre-embryos that have not been transferred with liquid nitrogen, which is known as vitrification. We identify them and store them in the embryo bank. These pre-embryos can be used in later cycles if a pregnancy is not achieved on the first attempt or, if it is achieved, for a second baby. The treatment to prepare the uterus for a transfer of frozen embryos is simpler, since it is not necessary to stimulate or extract the eggs.

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Pre-diagnosis

Do you have a question that can’t wait?

Request an appointment with our team or ask our experts.

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Pre-diagnosis

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